Where can you donate a mattress in Canada

You’ve come to the right place if you’re seeking for advice where can you donate a mattress in Canada. Millions of mattresses are thrown away each year in Canada, each of which can require up to 40 cubic feet of landfill space (average of 23 cubic feet) since they’re difficult to compress and break apart, and can take up to 120 years to disintegrate.

You probably have a few alternatives locally if you’re searching for the cheapest, simplest, and ideally most socially responsible method to dispose of your old mattress without it winding up in a landfill. It’s unlawful to ditch your mattress next to a dumpster or on the side of the road, and you might face a charge for garbage disposal. While donating the mattress may be your first inclination (and a good one!), your alternatives are limited depending on the state of the mattress.

Mattress Condition:

  • It might still be in good, usable shape, which means:
  • There are no insects or bed bugs in this room.
  • There are no rips, tears, or permanent indentations on this item.
  • Mold-free and dry
  • Stain-free, soiled-free, and discolored-free
  • In a home with cats or smokers, this product should not be used.
  • Smell-free
  • If you’re wanting to get rid of it for the following reasons:
  • You no longer require it as a result of a relocation or because it has surpassed its usefulness.
  • You’re switching to a larger or more expensive model.
  • The return period has ended, however the product is still not comfortable or firm enough.
  • You’re decluttering or downsizing.

General Instructions:

Please keep in mind that the following suggestions are broad in nature and may not apply to all groups in your region at any given moment. It all depends on how many mattresses they already have on hand and how much demand there is for mattresses in the area. Mattresses are also enormous and heavy, making them unsuitable for smaller establishments or those owned by senior citizens.

Charities and Organizations:

  • Thrift stores, for example, are non-profits and charity.
  • Crisis centers and shelters
  • Homes for people in groups
  • Housing for those in transition
  • Religious groups (churches, mosques)

They will either utilize the mattress to replace one on a bed they supply, market it for a modest price to help support their activities, or give it to someone in need directly. However, many charities and shelters have raised their quality requirements (and existing supply) as a result of the inflow of inexpensive mattresses from online-only mattress providers. Even if the mattress is clean, comfortable, and in usable shape, it may not be approved.

A furniture bank is a charity social enterprise that redistributes gently used furniture and housewares from community members who are replacing or downsizing their homes to individuals and families who are unable to furnish their homes.

While they may charge a fee for pick-up, they usually handle the entire procedure, including pick-up, inspection, minor repairs, storage, and final delivery. It’s generally less expensive than hiring a rubbish removal service, plus they’ll give you charity contribution receipts for the “fair market value” of the mattress (up to $250), so you can feel good knowing it went to aid a local family rather than being decomposed and recycled.

The contribution receipts are usually non-negotiable flat fixed values. The Niagara Furniture Bank, for example, would give you $146 for a queen box spring and $167 for a queen mattress.

Recycling facilities for mattresses:

If your mattress is no longer useful, recycling it is the most ecologically responsible option, since it lowers trash, energy consumption, and natural resource consumption.

Mattresses may be broken down and recycled into their raw ingredients in 75 percent to 99 percent of cases. However, because of the broad range of components in a mattress, recycling laws, restrictions, and standards differ substantially by province and municipality.

Here are furniture banks we found across Canada:

ProvinceCityWebsite
ABCalgaryWomen in Need Society (WINS)
ABCalgaryCalgary Inter-Faith Furniture Society
ABEdmonton, CalgaryJunk 4 Good
ABWinnipegOyate Tipi
ABWinnipegHands of Hope
BCBurnabyHelping Families in Need Society
BCVancouverShelter to Home
BCVancouverHomeStart Foundation
BCVernonNorth Okanagan Valley Gleaners
BCVictoriaVictoria Women in Need Community Cooperative
NLSt. John’sHome Again Furniture Bank
NSHalifaxParker Street Food and Furniture Bank
NSKentvilleOpen Arms
ONFort ErieMatthew House Fort Erie
ONGeorgian BayGeorgian Bay Furniture Bank
ONGTAJRCC Furniture Depot
ONKitchener-WaterlooThe Working Centre
ONKitchener-WaterlooThrift on Kent
ONLondonImpact Furniture Bank
ONNiagara FallsNiagara Furniture Bank
ONOakvilleMy Furniture Bank
ONOttawaHelping With Furniture
ONOttawaMatthew House Ottawa
ONScarboroughSCHC Furniture Bank
ONTorontoFurniture Bank
ONTorontoMatthew House Toronto
ONWindsorMatthew House Windsor
ONWindsorHabitat for Humanity
QCChicoutimiAtelier de Récupération Saint-Joseph
QCLavalGroupe d’Entraide La Rosée
QCMontrealWelcome Collective
QCMontrealMADA Center
SKFort SaskatchewanFort Saskatchewan Furniture Bank

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